Teen Acne. Results Are Possible.

I see a lot of teens in my treatment room and they all complain about acne and breakouts. I always know the ones that will listen to my suggestions and follow my advice vs the ones that will still do their own thing mixed in with my help. I do what I can and always hope for the best.

Sometimes what I recommend the first time may not work or it may not be strong enough which is why communication is so important. Instead of deciding to change it yourself, it is important to talk to me (or whoever is treating you) and let them know your concerns. It may be something simple but when you make the decision it becomes more difficult to figure out what went wrong. Mixing and matching your routine just doesn’t work.

Honesty and consistency is vital. I don’t think people are deciding to just lie to me, but I do think they leave out information. It makes it difficult to properly treat the situation and more than likely, the problem will not go away. Self-treating wasn’t working  and that is why the client came to me, right?

A big difference in only 4 months!

Patience is something else people need to have when it comes to teen acne. It is not something, for the most part, that goes away in a month. It takes time. Hormones are raging! I can’t control those but I can help with better skin. I will always be honest though. If I don’t see any improvement, I will say that. For each person that has followed my advice, has seen improvement though. Their skin gets healthier. Breakouts don’t always go away because, remember, hormones cannot be controlled on my end. And I am also not a fan of acne meds except for more extreme cases. I definitely don’t think it should be the go-to treatment but rather a last resort.

This is what results look like when YOU want results. It takes time each morning and night (not a lot) and a few other things depending on your lifestyle but if your skin is effecting your self-esteem, it should be worth it, right?

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Acne Meds and Their Side Effects

Yesterday I discussed the dangers of Accutane but there are a lot more acne medications out there and they can do some damage as well. Not only that, like Accutane, you are not fixing the problem. The best solution (and safest!) will always be a good skin care regimen and patience. Be realistic and know that your skin will not be corrected in a week or even a month. Some get lucky and all their skin needs is good skin care products but others have hormones going crazy in their body so it will take longer to have better skin. It’s frustrating, I know. Below is some more information about other medications.

Clindamycin– Antibiotics like clindamycin can disrupt the normal bacteria in the digestive tract, allowing undesirable bacteria to overgrow. A serious problem known as pseudomembranous colitis may result and can occur while you are taking the drug or even weeks later. Make sure to watch for signs of this problem, which can become life-threatening, such as bloody diarrhea or severe diarrhea. Dries out your skin and you got to stay out of the sun.

Tretinoin (Retin-A)– This has been around for a long time and they have found that not only was it helping with acne but also wrinkles so doctors are now prescribing it to those who want to fight aging. My biggest problem with this is that most people (at least the ones I talk to) don’t seem to be properly educated on this drug. It makes you sun-sensitive so wearing SPF every single day is vital. It can also thin your skin and make you sensitive to anything you put on your face. That means it limits what you can do for your skin. Also very drying.

Adapalene (Differin)– The consensus on this one is that it is more of a starter acne med but it still has all the wonderful (sarcasm) side effects that the others have too. Other possible side effects include hives, difficulty breathing, swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

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Tazarotene (Tazorac)– You may experience some skin burning, warmth, stinging, tingling, itching, redness, swelling, dryness, peeling, or irritation. Why would you want to use this with those side effects??

Here is a list of things you have to avoid while on any acne medications:

Sun, Waxing, Strong Skin Care Products (each person is different)

Here is a list of things you may (most likely) experience:

Dry Skin, Sensitive Skin, Peeling or Flaking, Irritated Skin

 

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Dairy and Acne

Acne. What is it? Who gets it? What causes it?

Acne. So common and so frustrating. For some, it lasts a few months or maybe a year but for others, they suffer for a very long time. Even using the right skin care products doesn’t completely rid the skin of this issue because oftentimes, it is hormonal. This is where medications come in and why doctors are so quick to prescribe. They can clear the skin and make the patient feel so much better. Unfortunately, there are side effects to that. Becoming well informed is the best option. Find out what works for you and your skin. Everyone is different.

What is It?

Acne is a skin condition that causes pimples or “zits.” This includes whiteheads, blackheads, and red, inflammed patches of skin (such as cysts).

Who Gets It?

Acne commonly starts during puberty between the ages of 10 and 13 and tends to be worse in people with oily skin. Teenage acne usually lasts for five to 10 years (I highlight this because so many expect it to go away as soon as they start on a regular skin care regimen), normally going away during the early 20s. It occurs in both sexes, although teenage boys tend to have the most severe cases (I am convinced that this is because they are less likely to take care of their skin properly). Just when you think you are safe from acne… Women are more likely than men to have mild to moderate forms into their 30s and beyond.

The simple truth is that heredity (blame your parents!) and hormones are behind most forms of acne.

Stages-of-Acne-best-acne-treatment

Causes?

Hormones– It is common in teenagers because of their increase in hormones. It is also why some women get it when they are pregnant or on birth control. When this is the cause, it makes it much more difficult to control. As an Esthetician, I can’t fix this but the skin can improve and we can get to a point where the breakouts are manageable.

Bacteria– Excess oil clogs the pores and it is here where the bacteria grows. This makes blackheads or whiteheads form on the skin’s surface. Sometimes, this clogging causes the follicle wall to break under the pressure of this buildup. When this happens, sebum leaks into nearby tissues and forms a pustule or a papule — this is called inflammatory acne. Larger, tender pustules are called nodules.

Tomorrow- How to Improve Your Skin