Witch Hazel. Is it Good for Your Skin?

Updated: October 2017

Witch Hazel– Did you know that alcohol used to be added to this so that it would evaporate on contact and create a cooling sensation? Nowadays it goes through the same distillation process to draw out essential oils and natural extracts.It is often used in toners and moisturizers to hydrate the skin, lessen oily skin soothe redness in skin and cleanse problem complexions.

Please note: Witch Hazel Astringent found in drugstores does contain alcohol and should definitely be avoided!

I love Hydrating Moisturizer (contains witch hazel) from Skin Script! It is what I use on my skin every morning.

HydratingMoisturizer

www.PSBLounge.com

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It Smells Good but Is it Safe?

Fragrances. It seems we either love ’em or we don’t. I don’t. I’ve never purchased a skin care product because it smelled good but I have decided to not purchase one because of the smell. I learned a few years that this actually worked out in my favor. I strongly dislike the smell of lavender (I feel the same way about vanilla) and this is one of the worst fragrances out there. These oils (fragrances) can irritate the skin, especially if you’re sensitive. Beware! Fragrances are generally not healthy for the skin and should be avoided.

The following is an excerpt from Paula Begoun. (pay close attention to the 1st sentence in the 2nd paragraph)

“There is no research showing it (lavender) has any benefit for skin (Sources: Phytotherapy Research, June 2002, pages 301–308). In fact, it can be a skin irritant but there is a conflicting research on just how much of a photosensitizer lavender can be. It appears lavender oil all by itself isn’t a photosensitizer, but when exposed to oxygen (as it would be when applied to your skin), one of it’s fragrant components, linalyl acetate forms substances that lead to allergic contact dermatitis in and out of sunlight (Sources: The New Ideal in Skin Health: Separating Fact from Fiction, Thornfeldt, Carl M.D., Allured Books, 2010, pages 286–287; Contact Dermatitis, January 2008, pages 9–14; Hautarzt, February 2002, pages 93–97; and Contact Dermatitis, August 1999, page 111).

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Research also indicates that other components of lavender, specifically linalool, can be cytotoxic, meaning that topical application causes skin-cell death (Source: Cell Proliferation, June 2004, pages 221–229). Lavender leaves contain camphor, which is known as a skin irritant. Because the fragrance constituents in lavender oil oxidize when exposed to air, lavender oil pro-oxidant. This enhanced oxidation also increases its irritancy on skin (Source: Contact Dermatitis, September 2008, pages 143–150). Lavender oil is the most potent form, and even small amounts of it (0.25% or less) can be problematic. It is a must to avoid in skin-care products, but is fine used as an aromatherapy agent for inhalation or relaxation (Source: Psychiatry Research, February 2007, pages 89–96; and http://www.naturaldatabase.com).”

www.SkinCarebyDevyn.com